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Kololi

Point of Interest

Kololi Beach

Kololi Beach

Kololi Beach Club

Kololi Beach Club

Black and White Safari Tours

Black and White Safari Tours

Craft Village

Craft Village

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Kololi Village Complex

 

 

History
The Kololi resort town and Senegambia Strip tourist area began life as a typical coastal fishing village, set back from the Atlantic Ocean, in the Kombo St. Mary District, Western Region of The Gambia, West Africa. The village is 18km from the Banjul capital. Since the early 1980s Kololi has been radically transformed by tourism, growing significantly and spreading right down to the beach, at what are now called the Palma Rima and Senegambia resort areas. Since the completion of the GamNor or Gambia-Norway Hotel in 1982 (now known as the Senegambia Beach Hotel), as well as the establishment of the tourist craft market in the same year, the town has seen a massive growth in the accommodation sector, and other tourism related industries. The original settlement, Kololi Village, is now home to an increasing number of professionals, expats, retirees and workers in the hospitality industry.

Kololi Beaches
In late 2003 the Kololi resort beaches were replenished (nourished), by a Dutch company called Delft Hydraulics, with about 1 million cubic meters of sand over 1.5km of its length, with a width of 120 meters. This was done to reverse previous coastal erosion that had seriously compromised the resort area’s ability to continue to attract large numbers of foreign tourists.

Senegambia Craft Market
The bendula at the Senegambia Craft Market was founded in the early 1980s and has 64 appointed craft stalls a well as others nearby.
The items are sourced in The Gambia and made locally. There are a wide range of art and craft for sale such as tie dye bags, hats, wooden carved masks, gourds, silver jewellery, numerous variations of drums, leather wallets and sandals and chains.
The Association was founded to stand for the economic interests of its members and to be act as an agent between the members and other organisations. It also examines avenues for exporting its members products during the low season.
One of the codes of conduct is that members should not hassle tourists and anyone found doing so could be suspended for 2 weeks. Another code says that Bumsters are not allowed in the craft market with tourists, they should wait outside.

The Village Complex
Also known as the Horseshoe Shopping Complex this is as close as you can get to a European style shopping mall. It is a unique, modern building on two floors, and the shaped like half a doughnut, located on the Bertil Harding Highway, opposite the Total Petrol Station. Is has a supermarket, clothes stores, a fountain, cafes selling cakes, drinks and ice cream, varied restaurants, some offices, a nice central garden, a rooftop terrace accessed by two spiral staircases, car parking space, and a children’s playground, to keep the kids occupied while you shop or dine. The Village Complex is a landmark you can easily spend all afternoon at, and there are no shortages of taxis to take you back to your hotel or guest house.

Accomodation
Depending on your preferences there are numerous types of holiday accommodation dotted around Kololi. From tourist-class hotels, to guesthouses, lodges, B&Bs and self-catering accommodation. Standards and room costs can vary widely, from a simple budget priced room in a down-at-heel guesthouse, to a luxury hotel suite with air conditioning and an ensuite bathroom.

Transport
There are now quite a handful of car rental firms operating in Gambia as compared to only a few back in the late 1990s. AB Gambia Car Rental can be found located at the front of the Senegambia Hotel. The others are AVIS at the Kairaba Hotel and Hertz at Banjul Airport and Afriq Cars Ltd in the Kololi Village Complex on the main highway near Senegambia. Your hotels’ receptionist can best advise you where to look for the most convenient car hire firm.
Alternatively you can hire a taxi on a daily basis as it simpler and cheaper. However low the price, don’t get into a vehicle that’s not roadworthy, has an impatient driver or someone you cannot communicate easily with. Finally, ask politely to see his or her driver’s licence is up to date, the seat belt is working properly and the lights and signals are in good working order.

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